About case management: Design your ultimate cola vending machine

Sadly the TV advert has disappeared from our screens once again: the short Coca Cola film in which a cola vending machine comes to life. As soon as the customer inserts some money the puppets inside get to work. Each one with its own job, all perfectly in tune with each other, and all enjoying their work. The end result: the consumer receives the right output. This film hits upon the very heart of focused working. But how should you, as a local authority, go about designing your own perfect cola vending machine…? 

 

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Digital customers and the connected world

Digital transformation is not a technology issue

We live in exciting times! As a lot of things are changing and changing dramatically! We live in a digital context which we as a consumer, company and society can no longer avoid. New technologies such as mobile, social cloud computing, sensors, virtual reality and 3D-printing are being introduced at an ever increasing rate and are unleashing a real revolution in our way of living and working. This digital context puts traditional organisations under pressure, results in new organisational forms (e.g. the Uber-type models such as AirBnB, Netflix, Spotify, Alibaba, etc.) and in this way forms a new society.

In this new society or connected world customers increasingly expect consistent personalised experiences through every service and communication channel. Organisations cannot afford to be left behind and must become mathematical champions that by the use of analytics (or to use a buzz word, big data) build clever algorithms to provide better or completely new customer experiences. This transition is not only vital to remain successful in the digital era, but also necessary to fulfil the expectations of the youngest generation (younger than 17 years of age), the customers of tomorrow. The customers of tomorrow or “network natives” live mainly in a virtual and global world. They are masters in the use of social media, spend a lot of time on their tablet or pc and make maximum use of all the online channels available to them. They are growing up with concepts such as crowdfunding and crowdsharing. In short, they consume differently.

Digital transformation is not a technology issue, but is primarily about reshaping your organisation in line with all your customers who seek both digital and human interaction

Organisations that answer the digital challenges by (purely) purchasing more technology without taking a good look at their organisational model will gradually get left far behind. They run the risk of being disrupted by new organisational forms. Just take the example here of the Uber-type models that use clever algorithms to connect customers, partners, employees and even products. Their organisational model is based on simply dealing in information without dealing in assets.

Uber: the world’s biggest taxi company does not have any cars; Facebook: the world’s most popular media company does not create any content itself; Alibaba: the world’s largest retailer has no stock, and AirBnB has no property. These companies make clever use of technology, but are above all highly connective, communicative and creative in their relationships. They make very sophisticated apps to connect in time and place with their customers. Via online communication, online diaries, social listening, public datasets, APIs, etc., they create added value for any interested party.

And above all the success of these companies is based on their flat organisational structure with short decision lines and high degree of autonomy (or self-control). They cultivate a climate of entrepreneurship and innovation and attach a great deal of value to the person behind every employee. Digital transformation is not a technology issue! Technology is only a means to reformulate and strengthen your organisational model to give your customers what they want. Digital technology enables you to act as a network rather than a hierarchy, to process masses of data continuously, to use organisational resources cheaply and on a global scale, to deal with uncertainties more effectively (by improved forecasting), to respond more quickly and more flexibly, etc.

It is high time to take a look at your organisational model too! How do you put your customers central? How do you connect with your network on a continuous basis? How do you use clever algorithms to improve customer experience end-to-end and/or overhaul it thoroughly? What actions are you taking today that will make you more resilient? How do you stimulate and reward innovation and entrepreneurship?

Becoming a digital company equals becoming a connected company, a customer company. It’s a journey: you need to start as early as possible, and there is no finish line. After all, when it comes to technology, the only constant is change.

Karl-Heinz Streibich, The Digital Enterprise

The digital patient is social, virtual and self-reliant

These are exciting times!

For the first time in human history, we are being simultaneously inundated with various disruptive technologies. Real game changers such as 3D printing, robots, virtual reality, big data and the Internet of Things are all on the edge of the breakthrough to the general public, while others such as mobile and social media are already established. You read everywhere that the impact on the healthcare sector is enormous, but in practice how tangible is it today? I will just zoom in briefly on a few of these trends.

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The only thing of real importance that leaders do is to create and manage culture. If you do not manage culture, it manages you, and you may not even be aware of the extent to which this is happening.

Professor Edgar Schein of the MIT Sloan School of Management,
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